Imprint Academic

Titles in this collection

  • Get Over Yourself

    Nietzsche for Our Times
    Patrick West

    Get Over Yourself both uses Nietzsche's philosophy to understand our society, and takes our society to explain his philosophy.

  • Your Brain's Politics

    How the Science of Mind Explains the Political Divide
    George Lakoff

    In this brief introduction, Lakoff and Wehling reveal how cognitive science research has advanced our understanding of political thought and language, forcing us to revise common folk theories about the rational voter.

  • The Demarchy Manifesto

    For Better Public Policy
    John Burnheim

    Demarchy exploits the possibilities of modern communications to give new role to public discussion. It takes the initiative in formulating policy on each specific problem out of the hands of political parties and into the hands of those most strongly affected by that particular problem. John Burnheim explains why this needs to be done.

  • Why Rape Culture is a Dangerous Myth

    From Steubenville to Ched Evans
    Luke Gittos

    This book argues that the belief in a 'rape culture' is seriously distorting our discussion of sexual violence.

  • Playing the Long Game

    How to Save the West from Short-Termism
    Laurie Fitzjohn-Sykes

    This book explains how short-termism is damaging our economy and what we can do about it.

  • Capitalism and Human Values

    Tony Wilkinson

    In this book we construct a foundation for values based on our common humanity and explore personal, social and political values from a fresh perspective.

  • That's Racist!

    How the Regulation of Speech and Thought Divides Us All
    Adrian Hart

    This book suggests that modern day anti-racism can be argued as having taken over from old-fashioned racism as the dominant racialising force in British society.

  • Global Philosophy

    What Philosophy Ought to Be
    Nicholas Maxwell

    This book is about education, learning, rational inquiry, philosophy, science studies, problem solving, academic inquiry, global problems, wisdom and, above all, the urgent need for an academic revolution.

  • Being Cultured

    in defence of discrimination
    Angus Kennedy

    Today culture is everywhere as maybe never before. We read culture reviews, watch culture shows, live in Cities of Culture, and witness the Cultural Olympiad. Government, museums and arts councils worry that we are not getting enough culture and shape...

  • How Universities Can Help Create a Wiser World

    The Urgent Need for an Academic Revolution
    Nicholas Maxwell

    In order to make progress towards a better world we need to learn how to do it. And for that we need institutions of learning rationally designed and devoted to helping us solve our global problems, make progress towards a better world. It is just...

  • Global Modernity

    And Other Essays
    Tom Rubens

    This group of essays follows a similar eclectic pattern to that found in Tom Rubens' previous essay-collections published by Imprint Academic. The author’s aim is, as before, to appeal widely but also succinctly: in a way that will stimulate readers...

  • In the Name of the People

    Pseudo-Democracy and the Spoiling of our World
    Ivo Mosley

    Are our 'democracies' truly democratic? In the Name of the People examines the myth of modern democracy and finds it wanting. The various oligarchies of the world blame the madness of modern life on the greed and stupidity of ordinary people: this...

  • There is No Such Thing As a Free Press...

    And we need one more than ever
    Mick Hume

    The aim of this book is to a launch a polemic for the freedom of the press against all of the attempts to police, defile and sanitise journalism today. Once the media reported the news. Now it makes it. The phone-hacking scandal and the Leveson...

  • Reaction

    Against the Modern World
    Peter King

    In this book the author explores the different facets of reaction and suggests that there is more to the concept than just a gratuitous insult.

  • Politics and Neo-Darwinism

    And other essays
    Tom Rubens

    This collection of essays is eclectic, covering certain political, ethical, cultural and philosophical topics. But running through all the material is the evolutionary-naturalistic perspective stated in the opening essay.

  • The Economic Imperative

    Leisure and Imagination in the 21st Century
    John Zerilli

    The book explores the role of leisure in modern life. It was written in the belief that leisure sets us apart as a species, that what is "useless" by commercial standards is probably the best thing we have going for us, and that leisure is under...

  • Panic on a Plate

    How Society Developed an Eating Disorder
    Rob Lyons

    The availability, range, cost and quality of food in Western societies have never been more favourable, yet food is also the focus of a great deal of anxiety. There are concerns that our current diets will mean we will get steadily fatter and more...

  • Avatar-Philosophy (and -Religion) Or FAITHEISM

    Edmond Wright

    Are you prepared, either as an atheist or a religious believer, to have your ideas of God, the self, other people, the body, the soul, spirituality, and faith challenged in an unexpected and original way? Here is a book that moves out from under and...

  • The Sarkozy Phenomenon

    Nick Hewlett

    In this short book the author argues that the Sarkozy phenomenon is best explained by principal reference to the notion of Bonapartism, which of course has a long history in French politics.

  • Democracy and the Fall of the West

    Craig Smith

    Democracy is killing the West. That is the stunning conclusion of this book that tears apart the consensus underpinning modern political assumptions. Democracy is held to solve one of the oldest puzzles of human social life: how do we ensure that our...

  • The Happy Passion

    A Personal View of Jacob Bronowski
    Anthony James

    Jacob Bronowski (1908-1974) lived through what he described as 'the two great catastrophes of the twentieth century: the rise of Hitler in 1933 and the dropping of the atomic bombs in 1945', and yet the keynote of his astonishingly rich and varied...

  • Just Another Ape?

    Helene Guldberg

    Today, the belief that human beings are special is distinctly out of fashion. Almost every day we are presented with new revelations about how animals are so much more like us than we ever imagined. The argument is at its most powerful when it comes...

  • Premiership

    The Development, Nature and Power of the Office of the British Prime Minister
    Andrew Blick

    This book combines the methods of history and political science to produce theories of the development, nature and power of the premiership, and to explain the implications for present politicians and analysts.

  • Economic Reform and a Liberal Culture

    And Other Essays on Social and Cultural Topics
    Tom Rubens

    This second collection of essays for the Societas series by Tom Rubens continues the author’s discussion of contemporary issues contained in "Progressive Secular Society" (Imprint Academic 2008). The present book is divided into three main sections...

  • Standing Up to Supernanny

    Jennie Bristow

    Parenthood, we are told, requires a massive adjustment to our lives, emotions, and relationships, and we have to be taught how to deal with that. But can it really be so bad that we need constant counselling and parenting classes? This book is about asking: Why have we invited Supernanny into our living rooms - and how can we kick her out?

  • Here For Our Children's Children?

    Why we should care for the earth
    Adrian C. Armstrong

    This study reviews the many different bases for wanting to preserve the environment. By seeing how protagonists approach the same situation from different assumptions, some of the origins of environmental conflict may be established, and ways of...

  • Darwinian Conservatism

    A Disputed Question
    Jr. Blanchard

    A reprint of Larry Arnhart's essay Darwinian Conservatism with comment and criticism from a variety of...

  • Religion, Politics, Evangelism

    Purna Chandra Jena

    This book seeks to show how religion is controlled by political ideologies, and how evangelism is moulded and manipulated by the demands of the dominant political order of the day.

  • Self and Society

    Studies in the Evolution of Culture
    William Irwin Thompson

    A series of essays on the evolution of culture, dealing with topics including the city and consciousness, evolution of the afterlife, literary and mathematical archetypes, machine consciousness and the implications of 9/11, and the invasion of Iraq.

  • Unlearning

    Or how NOT to be governed?
    Nader N. Chokr

    The aim of this book is to show why we should hold 'unlearning' to be a crucial ‘capability’ in and for education at this point in our history.

  • Independent

    The Rise of the Non-aligned Politician
    Richard Berry

    Martin Bell, Ken Livingstone and Richard Taylor (the doctor who became an MP to save his local hospital) are the best known of a growing band of British politicians making their mark outside the traditional party system. Some (like Livingstone) have...

  • Balancing Act

    National Identity and Sovereignty for Britain in Europe
    Atsuko Ichijo

    This is a careful examination of the historical formation of Britain and of key moments in its relations with the European powers. The author looks at the governing discourses of politicians, the mass media, and the British people. The rhetoric of...

  • Seeking Meaning and Making Sense

    John Haldane

    Collection of short essays that range across philosophy, politics, general culture, morality, science, religion and art, focusing on questions of meaning, value and understanding.

  • Progressive Secular Society

    And other essays relevant to secularism
    Tom Rubens

    This book gives a set of 'secular thoughts for the day' – many only a page or two long – on topics as varied as Shakespeare and Comte, economics, science and social action.

  • Healing, Hype or Harm?

    A Critical Analysis of Complementary or Alternative Medicine
    Edzard Ernst

    The scientists, academics and practitioners writing this book are not ‘against’ complementary or alternative medicine (CAM), but they are very much ‘for’ evidence-based medicine and single standards. They aim to counter-balance the many uncritical...

  • Enemies of Progress

    Dangers of Sustainability
    Austin Williams

    This polemical book examines the concept of sustainability and presents a critical exploration of its all-pervasive influence on society, arguing that sustainability, manifested in several guises, represents a pernicious and corrosive doctrine that...

  • In Bed with Madness

    Trying to make sense in a world that doesn't
    Yannis Androcopoulos

    Globalism endowed us with McDonald's, 'the world’s local bank’, English football teams without English players and an irrepressible desire for more as enough is never good enough – the blanket is always too short. Our personal world as much as our...

  • The Greek Inheritance

    Ancient Greek wisdom for the digital era
    Yannis Androcopoulos

    The culture of ancient Greece, a culture of joy, was replaced by the Judaeo-Christian culture of faith and then by the capitalist culture of profit. Yet it is the only culture worth fighting for if we want a world run by humans rather than...

  • The Future of the Past

    From the culture of profit to the culture of joy
    Yannis Androcopoulos

    Universalism in its old forms has, just like door-to-door milkmen, gone for good. But the search for some universally accepted ethical standards cannot be abandoned – values are not colourless as the wind and odourless as thoughts. Looking into our...

  • Froude Today

    John Coleman

    A.L. Rowse called fellow-historian James Anthony Froude the ‘last great Victorian awaiting revival’. The question of power is the problem that perplexes every age: in his historical works Froude examined how it applied to the Tudor period, and...

  • Universities

    The Recovery of an Idea
    Gordon Graham

    Research assessment exercises, teaching quality assessment, line management, staff appraisal, student course evaluation, modularization, student fees — these are all names of innovations (and problems) — in modern British universities. How far do they...

  • Forgiveness

    How Religion Endangers Morality
    R.A. Sharpe

    In his book The Moral Case against Religious Belief (1997), the author argued that some important virtues cease to be virtues at all when set in a religious context, and that, consequently, a religious life is, in many respects, not a good life to...

  • Joseph Conrad Today

    Kieron O'Hara

    This book argues that the novelist Joseph Conrad's work speaks directly to us in a way that none of his contemporaries can. Conrad’s scepticism, pessimism, emphasis on the importance and fragility of community, and the difficulties of escaping our...

  • Why Spirituality is Difficult for Westerners

    David Hay

    Dr Hay is Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the University of Aberdeen. A zoologist by profession, his research has been guided by the hypothesis that religious or spiritual awareness is biologically natural to the human species and has been selected for in evolution.

  • Public Health and Globalisation

    Why a National Health Service is Morally Indefensible
    Iain Brassington

    Claims that there are good arguments for a public health service that do not amount to arguments for a national health service, but for something that looks far more like a transnational health service.

  • Earthy Realism

    The Meaning of Gaia
    Mary Midgley

    GAIA, named after the ancient Greek mother- goddess, is the notion that the Earth and the life on it form an active, self-maintaining whole. By its use of personification it attacks the view that the physical world is inert and lifeless. It has a...

  • Paradoxes of Power

    Reflections on the Thatcher Interlude
    Alfred Sherman

    The book describes Sir Alfred Sherman's early relationship with Sir Keith Joseph and his own role in the formation of the Centre for Policy Studies in 1974. Sherman examines the origins and development of 'Thatcherism', but concludes that the Conservative administrations of the 1980s were, for the most part, an ‘interlude’.

  • Right Road to Radical Freedom

    Tibor R. Machan

    This work focuses on the topic of freedom. The author starts with the old issue of free will — do we as individual human beings choose our conduct, at least partly independently, freely?

  • Debating Humanism

    Dolan Cummings

    Features a cross-disciplinary dialogue among writers who are sympathetic to the humanist tradition and interested in developing a new humanist project through...

  • Village Democracy

    John Papworth

    The author passionately sets out his argument for radical decentralisation of power as the only answer to the current crises in politics, trade, ecology, and international affairs.

  • Conservative Consensus?

    Housing Policy Before 1997 and After
    Peter King

    New Labour would like to portray 1997 as a new beginning for public policy, but Peter King argues that we now have, in housing and in other areas of public policy, a consensus based on Thatcherite reforms. He explores the particularly conservative...

  • Putting Morality Back into Politics

    Richard Ryder

    Machiavelli almost succeeded in removing morality from European politics and, indeed, since his day it has sometimes been assumed that morality and politics are separate. Ryder argues that the time has come for public policies to be seen to be based upon moral objectives.

  • Referendum Roundabout

    Kieron O'Hara

    A lively and sharp critique of the role of the referendum in modern British politics.

  • Knowledge Monopolies

    The Academisation of Society
    Alan Shipman

    Historians and sociologists chart the consequences of the expansion of knowledge; philosophers of science examine the causes. This book bridges the gap. The focus is on ‘academisation’ — the paradox whereby, as the general public becomes better...

  • Moral Mind

    A Study of What it is to be Human
    Henry Haslam

    The reality and validity of the moral sense — which ordinary people take for granted — took a battering in the last century. Materialist trends in philosophy, decline in religious faith, and a loosening of traditional moral constraints contributed to...

  • Darwinian Conservatism

    Larry Arnhart

    The Left has traditionally assumed that human nature is so malleable, so perfectible, that it can be shaped in almost any direction. Conservatives object, arguing that social order arises not from rational planning but from the spontaneous order of...

  • Doing Less with Less

    Making Britain More Secure
    Paul Robinson

    The only way to avoid dodgy dossiers and dubious foreign adventures is to acknowledge that the post-Cold War world is a far safer place than neoconservative rhetoricians would have us believe. The Ministry of Defence should reclaim its pre-Orwellian...

  • Who's Afraid of a European Constitution?

    Neil MacCormick

    In this short but authoritative book, the nature and purpose of the European Constitution are explained by someone involved in its preparation.

  • Great Abdication

    Why Britain's Decline is the Fault of the Middle Class
    Alexander Deane

    The middle class provides British society with its stability and strength. According to Deane’s contentious thesis, our middle class has abstained from its responsibility to uphold societal values, and the enormously damaging collapse of our society’s...

  • Tony Blair and the Ideal Type

    Jack H. Grainger

    The 'ideal type' is Max Weber's hypothetical leading democratic politician, whom the author finds realized in Tony Blair.

  • Paradoxical Primate

    Colin Talbot

    Human beings have an evolved but highly adaptable nature. This book sets out to establish a new framework for understanding human nature, from an evolutionary perspective but drawing on existing social sciences.

  • Why the Mind is Not a Computer

    A Pocket Lexicon of Neuromythology
    Raymond Tallis

    The equation "Mind = Machine" is false. This pocket lexicon of "neuromythology" shows why.

  • Snake That Swallowed Its Tail

    Some Contradictions in Modern Liberalism
    Mark Garnett

    Tracing its effects through the media, politics and the public services, the author argues that hollowed-out liberalism has helped to produce our present discontent.

  • Our Last Great Illusion

    A Radical Psychoanalytical Critique of Therapy Culture
    Rob Weatherill

    'Therapy may be mad,' declares Rob Weatherill in this outspoken volume. Therapy here means particularly psychotherapy and counselling, but should be also taken to signify the universal logic of the post-modern therapeutic culture.

  • Party's Over

    Blueprint for a Very English Revolution
    Keith Sutherland

    This book examines the historical forces that gave rise to the modern political party and questions its role in the post-ideological age. If we all now share the liberal market consensus, then what is the function of the party?

  • Off with Their Wigs!

    Judicial Revolution in Modern Britain
    Charles Banner

    On Thursday June 12th 2003, a press release concerning a Cabinet reshuffle declared as a footnote that the office of Lord Chancellor was to be abolished and that a new Supreme Court would replace the House of Lords as the highest court in the United...

  • Modernisation Imperative

    Bruce Charlton

    This book argues that contemporary society in Western democracies is generally misunderstood to be a pyramidal hierarchy dominated either by government or the economy. Neither view is correct. We live in a fundamentally pluralistic society divided...

  • Democracy, Fascism and the New World Order

    Ivo Mosley

    Democracy is not a universal good, it is a political system, and like all political systems it is open to corruption. The word ‘democracy’ means ‘rule by the people’, not rule by a simple majority. To achieve rule by all the people, it used to be...

  • Liberty Option

    Tibor R. Machan

    The Liberty Option advances the idea that for compelling moral as well as practical reasons it is the free society -- with the rule of law founded on the principles of private property rights, its complete respect for individual sovereignty and...

  • Last Prime Minister

    Being Honest About the U.K. Presidency
    Graham Allen

    Echoing Mahatma Gandhi's comment on Western civilization, Graham Allen thinks the British constitution would be a very good idea—a clear constitution providing real power to the British people and their elected representatives. In The Last Prime...

  • Case Against the Democratic State

    An Essay in Cultural Criticism
    Gordon Graham

    The history of the last two hundred years is a story of the immense and relentless growth of the State at the expense of other social institutions. We are now so familiar and accepting of the State's pre-eminence in all things, that few think to...

  • God in Us

    A Case for Christian Humanism
    Anthony Freeman

    God In Us is a radical representation of the Christian faith for the 21st century. Following the example of the Old Testament prophets and the first-century Christians it overturns received ideas about God. God is not an invisible person 'out there'...